CURRICULUM

Complete Game Broadcasting's principal goal is to prepare its trainees for a career in sports broadcasting. To do that, you'll need to leave with a worthy demo tape. And to do that, you'll have to acquire the skills necessary to create a good demo tape.

So, the key will be repetition. The instructors and I will not spend one nanosecond lecturing about anything other than how to get better. If you want to learn about history and theories, I'm glad to stay after-hours discussing it. But, during the week, we will:

  1. Produce a daily tv/radio program that we will stream to the internet, financed by outside advertising sponsorships.
  2. Air twice-weekly a live play-by-play broadcast, whether of high school sports or a higher level, which will also be sold to advertisers, who will expect a good broadcast. You will be able to tell future employers that you worked in "commercial broadcasting." No other school, anywhere, is doing this kind of thing.
  3. Teach you to write a good lede and how to construct a typical VO/SOT or radio script.
  4. Everyone will help produce a weekly 90-second feature package. (A "package" is an edited video segment, which typically is built with narration, natural sound, music and interview sound bites.) The package is the cornerstone of any television demo tape.
  5. Bring in a television journalist, who will make critical suggestions on improving your tape.This particular journalist makes his living reviewing tapes.
  6. Bring in a radio journalist to do the same for radio-emphasis students.

A lot to accomplish in nine weeks, right? Will there be trainees who need longer than that to compile a worthy resume/demo tape? Absolutely. To that, I say: Don't make this a race against the clock. Take all the time you need. You can schedule edit time after your training period is through to fine-tune. In fact, I think you'd be foolish not to!

Regards,

Jeff Batten
Director
email Jeff